Ian Plimer, a Geologist’s View of Climate Change at Heartland Institute Climate Conference, 2023

Ian Plimer, Ph.D., a geologist and emeritus professor at the University of Melbourne, delivers a presentation titled “The Past is the Key to the Present.” He starts by noting that “you will not find any people in my profession who would claim that humans can change a major planetary system.” Then he goes through the fundamentals of the causes of climate change that you can see from the history of the planet. In the end, Dr. Plimer shows that planetary cycles going back to the end of the Pleistocene glaciation nearly 15,000 years ago show that we are due for …

Thirty Years of Unique Data Reveal What’s Really Killing Coral Reefs

Brian Lapointe, Ph.D., senior author and a research professor at FAU’s Harbor Branch, swims above bleached coral reefs in Looe Key in the lower Florida Keys. (Photo credit: Marie Tarnowski) Florida Atlantic University By gisele galoustian | 7/15/2019 Coral reefs are considered one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet and are dying at alarming rates around the world. Scientists attribute coral bleaching and ultimately massive coral death to a number of environmental stressors, in particular, warming water temperatures due to climate change. A study published in the international journal Marine Biology , reveals what’s really killing coral reefs. …

Hello My Dear Greta and Fellow Thinkers

Man and fossil fuel use do not increase atmospheric carbon dioxide content ; natural laws of physics do. What is our relationship to the natural world? Do we view ourselves as separate from it, as masters and manipulators of the environment? Or do we see ourselves as interconnected and interdependent with all that surrounds us? Glossary of Names, Terms, & Scientific Principles Used in Pinatubo Study Video and Related Papers

A New Look at Physico-Chemical Causes of Changing Climate: Is the Seasonal Variation in Seawater Temperature a Significant Factor in Establishing the Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide in the Earth’s Atmosphere?

Ivan R. Kennedy, John W. Runcie, Shuo Zhang and Raymond J. Ritchie Thermo 2022, 2, 401–434. https://doi.org/10.3390/thermo2040028 Abstract: Seasonal oscillations in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the Earth’s atmosphere, stronger in northern latitudes, are assumed to show that terrestrial photosynthesis exceeds respiration in summer, reducing the pCO2 in air but increasing its value in winter when respiration exceeds photosynthesis. We disagree, proposing that variation in the temperature of the surface mixing zone of seawater also reversibly regulates the pCO2 in air as a non-equilibrium process between air and seawater. We predict by thermal modelling that carbonate (CO32−) …

Rebuttal and corrections to Dr. Roy Spencer’s analysis and comments regarding the Pinatubo Study

Bud Bromley & Tomer Tamarkin April 16, 2023 Dr. Roy Spencer is mistaken on all of the points in his review and posts concerning the ClimateCite-Bromley-Tamarkin-Menahem Pinatubo Study report and associated collateral materials. Our main Pinatubo study is not about the CO2 emissions from Pinatubo, as Tom Tamarkin has correctly instructed Roy numerous times over the course of the last year. . There was no reason or interest to attempt to quantify the CO2 emitted from Pinatubo. Others have estimated and reported that CO2 release. But more importantly, the perturbation to CO2 trend following the eruption which we studied was …

TITLE: ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE AND MARINE INTERACTION

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report studies causes which explain the recorded atmospheric annual CO2 flux variation of about 5 parts per million (ppm). The amount is part of an annual CO2 flow of about 28 ppm (221Gt) through the seasonal transfer of atmospheric CO2 between the southern and northern oceans. The flow is driven by changes in sea temperature which also controls the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere as per Henry’s Law. Anthropogenic CO2 is up to 36Gt which adds 16% to the current natural flux. While this is a notable portion, there is no satellite evidence to suggest there …